Sensory Control of Your Business Operations

October 20, 2017

When you’re observing and testing any product, you use your senses to determine its value. Essentially, every new thing that you run across, you kick the tires to see what it feels like, and then you use your other senses to absorb what you can about the product in question. You can use that philosophy to improve your business output. In other words, with a little bit of creative thinking, you can maintain some sensory control of your business operations.

Specifically, you can look into the smells, the sounds, and the visual appeal of your business at large. Touch and taste are outside of the scope of many industries, but those other three that you can pay attention to create a distinct value if you work through them accordingly. Every industry has different sensory output, and every microcosm concerning production has its sensory output, so you’ll have to customize your process, but at least having that outside perspective can help you make appropriate decisions.

Smells

Consider for a moment the idea of industrial smells. At some commercial plants, you can expect to smell paint or paint thinner. At other industrial locations, you may run into the smell of sewage. Odor control is a big deal if it means that clients will or won’t use your service based on what they smell near your building. Smell is of particular interest to companies that deal with food or consumer products that are up close to people’s faces. A product that has a sharp plastic odor may not sell as well as a product that has that new car smell that people enjoy. Controlling the olfactory sense up and down your chain of production can be a vital element in improving your sales output. A process as simple as adding an essential oil to your product somewhere along the line can be the difference between success and failure.

Sounds

And how about taking on the idea of sound? When you install soundproofing in a space or building, you are taking care of all sorts of irritants. As far as workers go, they will be less agitated by the noise around them and will be able to hear each other more clearly. Clients are always going to feel more invited into space where there is not a tremendous amount of background noise distracting them. And if your commercial space is anywhere near residential areas, having the police called because of noise complaints is not going to be high on your priority list of positive things.

Visual Appeal

And finally, there’s the perpetual idea that something that looks better has a higher quality. Visual appeal is enormous because audiences often make snap judgments about a product simply based on how it looks. And to a degree, your businesses façade is a type of visual appeal. If people drive up to your place of business and see a mess, it doesn’t matter how good your product is, they will have an initial poor judgment of your company.

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